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Root canals and Romans 5:3

My dentist of over forty years is a very kind and gentle man. It was with genuine regret that he informed me week before last that I needed to go to a specialist for a root canal. I cringed at the thought but my wife reassured me that when she had one it was not bad. But much to my chagrin I learned after being checked that I needed two root canals. I tried to bargain for a two-for-the-price-of-one special with no avail. The procedure was not bad but by noon the next day I was in excruciating pain.

I thought I was following instructions taking the prescription pain medicine, but by four o’clock I decided I couldn’t bear it any longer and called to find the office was closed. I reached the doctor by an emergency number and he told me to take Advil in addition to the other medicine. After a few more hours the pain was finally down to a bearable level.

As I thought about the intensity of the pain I endured, I thought about how difficult it is for people who are

suffering to believe that God can bring any good out of their trial. Pain is obviously unpleasant. There is nothing good about pain itself, but it is comforting to know God may bring something good out of it as we learn more of our complete dependence on Him and develop a fonder anticipation for that day when we will be with the Lord and all suffering is over.

This is what Paul affirmed in his letter to the Romans, paradoxically proclaiming "we glory in tribulations also" -- how? why? -- "knowing that tribulation worketh patience..." (5:3). As we have been considering in our current broadcast Why God's People Suffer, it is crucial to recognize the ability of God to shape and mold us through our trials. That is, of course, until He conforms us perfectly to His Son's image one day.

I remember when my old friend E.D. Bryant was struggling with a brain tumor he often said, “I know the Lord is going to heal me, either here or in heaven.” E.D. went home to be with the Lord and, indeed, his sufferings are over. It is a joy to consider that some day all of the pain and the weeping of this life will be behind us.

Resource: 'Finding Grace' Blog Categories: Finding Grace, Patience & Hope, Sovereignty of God

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My dentist of over forty years is a very kind and gentle man. It was with genuine regret that he informed me week before last that I needed to go to a specialist for a root canal. I cringed at the thought but my wife reassured me that when she had one it was not bad. But much to my chagrin I learned after being checked that I needed two root canals. I tried to bargain for a two-for-the-price-of-one special with no avail. The procedure was not bad but by noon the next day I was in excruciating pain.

I thought I was following instructions taking the prescription pain medicine, but by four o’clock I decided I couldn’t bear it any longer and called to find the office was closed. I reached the doctor by an emergency number and he told me to take Advil in addition to the other medicine. After a few more hours the pain was finally down to a bearable level.

As I thought about the intensity of the pain I endured, I thought about how difficult it is for people who are

suffering to believe that God can bring any good out of their trial. Pain is obviously unpleasant. There is nothing good about pain itself, but it is comforting to know God may bring something good out of it as we learn more of our complete dependence on Him and develop a fonder anticipation for that day when we will be with the Lord and all suffering is over.

This is what Paul affirmed in his letter to the Romans, paradoxically proclaiming "we glory in tribulations also" -- how? why? -- "knowing that tribulation worketh patience..." (5:3). As we have been considering in our current broadcast Why God's People Suffer, it is crucial to recognize the ability of God to shape and mold us through our trials. That is, of course, until He conforms us perfectly to His Son's image one day.

I remember when my old friend E.D. Bryant was struggling with a brain tumor he often said, “I know the Lord is going to heal me, either here or in heaven.” E.D. went home to be with the Lord and, indeed, his sufferings are over. It is a joy to consider that some day all of the pain and the weeping of this life will be behind us.